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Judgment: The father appealed from the dismissal of his application under the 1980 Hague Convention. The judge had decided that the child was habitually resident in Australia rather than France at the date of the retention in England and Wales, and thus in her view the Hague Convention did not apply. The Court of Appeal determined that the child had been habitually resident in France, but, since it was an issue in other pending cases, Moylan LJ addressed the issue of principle: whether there was power under the 1980 Convention to return a child to a state other than that in which they had been habitually resident. In Moylan LJ's view, "the 1980 Convention applies whenever the child is habitually resident in a Contracting State, other than the requested state, at the date of the alleged wrongful removal or retention", and "there is power under the 1980 Convention to order that a child be returned to a third state". This question had been expressly considered at the time of the convention's drafting and a proposal that the return should always be to the state of habitual residence had not been adopted. To confine Article 12 as suggested would fail to protect children from the harmful effects of their abduction. While Baker LJ and Phillips LJ agreed as to the child's habitual residence in France, they declined to express an obiter view on the issue of principle. Baker LJ warned of the danger of judges thinking that the degree of integration in a second country had to be equivalent to that enjoyed in the first for a child to acquire habitual residence.

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